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Word Count Examples: What Do Specific Word Counts Look Like?


Do you find setting a word count for your content difficult because you’re not sure what it actually translates to onto a page? Here’s an idea of what specific word counts look like on a page - as well as on a PDF with Arial size 11 font.

P.s. A.A. Milne is one of our favourites - so here’s one of his famous Winnie The Pooh stories used as our example. Enjoy! We’ve included the link to the rest of the story at the bottom of the page.

50 words

You could tell that Christopher Robin had something important to say from the way he clasped his knees tightly and wriggled his toes. Everybody gathered round and looked at him expectantly. “I’ve heard that her Majesty ...” Christopher Robin began. “Oh,” squeaked Piglet in a state of great excitement.

100 words

You could tell that Christopher Robin had something important to say from the way he clasped his knees tightly and wriggled his toes. Everybody gathered round and looked at him expectantly. “I’ve heard that her Majesty ...” Christopher Robin began. “Oh,” squeaked Piglet in a state of great excitement. “Her Royal Highness ...” he went on. “Quite so, quite so,” agreed Rabbit. “The Queen of England ...” he said quickly before anyone else could interrupt him. “Oh, The Queen,” said Pooh Bear, much relieved. “The other people you mentioned sounded much too tall and fearsome, but The Queen is quite different.”

250 words

You could tell that Christopher Robin had something important to say from the way he clasped his knees tightly and wriggled his toes. Everybody gathered round and looked at him expectantly. “I’ve heard that her Majesty ...” Christopher Robin began. “Oh,” squeaked Piglet in a state of great excitement. “Her Royal Highness ...” he went on. “Quite so, quite so,” agreed Rabbit. “The Queen of England ...” he said quickly before anyone else could interrupt him. “Oh, The Queen,” said Pooh Bear, much relieved. “The other people you mentioned sounded much too tall and fearsome, but The Queen is quite different.”

Pooh had once sent a letter and was told to stick on a small picture of The Queen. It stuck more to his nose than to the letter, but it told the postman that it was Most Urgent and that The Queen Says It Must Be Sent and so he was sure it had been. “As I was saying,” said Christopher Robin, passing Pooh a honey sandwich so that he might continue speaking, “Her Majesty The Queen is celebrating an important birthday, her ninetieth birthday. And we should too. Celebrate it, that is, by giving her a present.”

“I had a present once,” sighed Eeyore wistfully. “Two, in fact, if I may boast a little. One was rather small and damp and the other somewhat larger and sticky. But I don’t like to complain. A present is Something and to have two is Something Else.”

500 words

You could tell that Christopher Robin had something important to say from the way he clasped his knees tightly and wriggled his toes. Everybody gathered round and looked at him expectantly. “I’ve heard that her Majesty ...” Christopher Robin began. “Oh,” squeaked Piglet in a state of great excitement. “Her Royal Highness ...” he went on. “Quite so, quite so,” agreed Rabbit. “The Queen of England ...” he said quickly before anyone else could interrupt him. “Oh, The Queen,” said Pooh Bear, much relieved. “The other people you mentioned sounded much too tall and fearsome, but The Queen is quite different.”

Pooh had once sent a letter and was told to stick on a small picture of The Queen. It stuck more to his nose than to the letter, but it told the postman that it was Most Urgent and that The Queen Says It Must Be Sent and so he was sure it had been. “As I was saying,” said Christopher Robin, passing Pooh a honey sandwich so that he might continue speaking, “Her Majesty The Queen is celebrating an important birthday, her ninetieth birthday. And we should too. Celebrate it, that is, by giving her a present.”

“I had a present once,” sighed Eeyore wistfully. “Two, in fact, if I may boast a little. One was rather small and damp and the other somewhat larger and sticky. But I don’t like to complain. A present is Something and to have two is Something Else.”

Both Pooh and Piglet blushed slightly. They had a memory of a wonderful balloon and a large jar of the best honey that had begun as Exceedingly Good presents and then, due to various mishaps, had

become Rather Disappointing presents, but which were present nevertheless and as Eeyore had said – that was Something.

“The question is,” said Rabbit importantly, “what do Queens like best?” “Honey, I should think,” sighed Pooh, looking at the small, sticky crumb where the honey sandwiches had once been. “I’ve heard,” said Christopher Robin, who knew a great deal about faraway places like the other side of the Forest and London, “that The Queen has a grand tea every day in her palace, with buttered toast and crumpets, so I shouldn’t think we’d need to give her anything to eat. Her present should be something to treasure.”

“I’ve never had much luck finding treasure,” sighed Pooh. “But I did once find the North Pole. Do you suppose The Queen might like that?”. The friends thought this an excellent idea, but it wasn’t long before they realised that finding the North Pole once was a very fine thing but that finding it again was an altogether different thing. Suddenly the Forest seemed to be full of sticks that could or could not be the North Pole. “This will never do,” announced Rabbit. “Do ...” mumbled Pooh. “That brings to mind a little hum which I’d like to hum if it was felt that a hum was called for at such a time of thoughtfulness.”

750 words

You could tell that Christopher Robin had something important to say from the way he clasped his knees tightly and wriggled his toes. Everybody gathered round and looked at him expectantly. “I’ve heard that her Majesty ...” Christopher Robin began. “Oh,” squeaked Piglet in a state of great excitement. “Her Royal Highness ...” he went on. “Quite so, quite so,” agreed Rabbit. “The Queen of England ...” he said quickly before anyone else could interrupt him. “Oh, The Queen,” said Pooh Bear, much relieved. “The other people you mentioned sounded much too tall and fearsome, but The Queen is quite different.”

Pooh had once sent a letter and was told to stick on a small picture of The Queen. It stuck more to his nose than to the letter, but it told the postman that it was Most Urgent and that The Queen Says It Must Be Sent and so he was sure it had been. “As I was saying,” said Christopher Robin, passing Pooh a honey sandwich so that he might continue speaking, “Her Majesty The Queen is celebrating an important birthday, her ninetieth birthday. And we should too. Celebrate it, that is, by giving her a present.”

“I had a present once,” sighed Eeyore wistfully. “Two, in fact, if I may boast a little. One was rather small and damp and the other somewhat larger and sticky. But I don’t like to complain. A present is Something and to have two is Something Else.”

Both Pooh and Piglet blushed slightly. They had a memory of a wonderful balloon and a large jar of the best honey that had begun as Exceedingly Good presents and then, due to various mishaps, had

become Rather Disappointing presents, but which were present nevertheless and as Eeyore had said – that was Something.

“The question is,” said Rabbit importantly, “what do Queens like best?” “Honey, I should think,” sighed Pooh, looking at the small, sticky crumb where the honey sandwiches had once been. “I’ve heard,” said Christopher Robin, who knew a great deal about faraway places like the other side of the Forest and London, “that The Queen has a grand tea every day in her palace, with buttered toast and crumpets, so I shouldn’t think we’d need to give her anything to eat. Her present should be something to treasure.”

“I’ve never had much luck finding treasure,” sighed Pooh. “But I did once find the North Pole. Do you suppose The Queen might like that?”. The friends thought this an excellent idea, but it wasn’t long before they realised that finding the North Pole once was a very fine thing but that finding it again was an altogether different thing. Suddenly the Forest seemed to be full of sticks that could or could not be the North Pole. “This will never do,” announced Rabbit. “Do ...” mumbled Pooh. “That brings to mind a little hum which I’d like to hum if it was felt that a hum was called for at such a time of thoughtfulness.”

And without waiting for a reply, he began: The Queen lived in her palace, as Queens often do. Doing all those busy things that busy Queens do. But The Queen could never know, as you and I do, That doing nothing much can be the BEST thing to do. So from a forest far away, for your special day, We’re sending you some quiet and a little time to play. And quiet there was. The sort of quiet that makes the tip of your

nose turn a sunset-shade of pink.

“Bear,” announced Christopher Robin solemnly. “That hum is fit for a Queen. That hum shall be The Queen’s present. Owl shall write it out, and you and I and Eeyore will deliver it to Buckingham Palace. And Piglet must come too because London is a very big place indeed and even small animals, if they are very good friends, can make everything alright.”

And so it was decided and Owl was called for. Owl fussed here and fussed there and used up a good deal of time, paper and ink but at last, it was done, and everyone admired it. Kanga, who knew how important presentation was, especially for Queens, took the hum, rolled it and tied a thick vine around it. Into the vine she twisted wild heather, columbine, buttercups, meadowsweet, thyme and lastly a thistle, kindly donated by Eeyore. Christopher Robin also found a beautiful, bright red balloon, which he thought The Queen might enjoy on grey days.









1000 words

You could tell that Christopher Robin had something important to say from the way he clasped his knees tightly and wriggled his toes. Everybody gathered round and looked at him expectantly. “I’ve heard that her Majesty ...” Christopher Robin began. “Oh,” squeaked Piglet in a state of great excitement. “Her Royal Highness ...” he went on. “Quite so, quite so,” agreed Rabbit. “The Queen of England ...” he said quickly before anyone else could interrupt him. “Oh, The Queen,” said Pooh Bear, much relieved. “The other people you mentioned sounded much too tall and fearsome, but The Queen is quite different.”

Pooh had once sent a letter and was told to stick on a small picture of The Queen. It stuck more to his nose than to the letter, but it told the postman that it was Most Urgent and that The Queen Says It Must Be Sent and so he was sure it had been. “As I was saying,” said Christopher Robin, passing Pooh a honey sandwich so that he might continue speaking, “Her Majesty The Queen is celebrating an important birthday, her ninetieth birthday. And we should too. Celebrate it, that is, by giving her a present.”

“I had a present once,” sighed Eeyore wistfully. “Two, in fact, if I may boast a little. One was rather small and damp and the other somewhat larger and sticky. But I don’t like to complain. A present is Something and to have two is Something Else.”

Both Pooh and Piglet blushed slightly. They had a memory of a wonderful balloon and a large jar of the best honey that had begun as Exceedingly Good presents and then, due to various mishaps, had

become Rather Disappointing presents, but which were present nevertheless and as Eeyore had said – that was Something.

“The question is,” said Rabbit importantly, “what do Queens like best?” “Honey, I should think,” sighed Pooh, looking at the small, sticky crumb where the honey sandwiches had once been. “I’ve heard,” said Christopher Robin, who knew a great deal about faraway places like the other side of the Forest and London, “that The Queen has a grand tea every day in her palace, with buttered toast and crumpets, so I shouldn’t think we’d need to give her anything to eat. Her present should be something to treasure.”

“I’ve never had much luck finding treasure,” sighed Pooh. “But I did once find the North Pole. Do you suppose The Queen might like that?”. The friends thought this an excellent idea, but it wasn’t long before they realised that finding the North Pole once was a very fine thing but that finding it again was an altogether different thing. Suddenly the Forest seemed to be full of sticks that could or could not be the North Pole. “This will never do,” announced Rabbit. “Do ...” mumbled Pooh. “That brings to mind a little hum which I’d like to hum if it was felt that a hum was called for at such a time of thoughtfulness.”

And without waiting for a reply, he began: The Queen lived in her palace, as Queens often do. Doing all those busy things that busy Queens do. But The Queen could never know, as you and I do, That doing nothing much can be the BEST thing to do. So from a forest far away, for your special day, We’re sending you some quiet and a little time to play. And quiet there was. The sort of quiet that makes the tip of your

nose turn a sunset-shade of pink.

“Bear,” announced Christopher Robin solemnly. “That hum is fit for a Queen. That hum shall be The Queen’s present. Owl shall write it out, and you and I and Eeyore will deliver it to Buckingham Palace. And Piglet must come too because London is a very big place indeed and even small animals, if they are very good friends, can make everything alright.”

And so it was decided and Owl was called for. Owl fussed here and fussed there and used up a good deal of time, paper and ink but at last it was done, and everyone admired it. Kanga, who knew how important presentation was, especially for Queens, took the hum, rolled it and tied a thick vine around it. Into the vine she twisted wild heather, columbine, buttercups, meadowsweet, thyme and lastly a thistle, kindly donated by Eeyore. Christopher Robin also found a beautiful, bright red balloon, which he thought The Queen might enjoy on grey days.

“Piglet, you should hold it,” he said. “That way, we won’t lose you in the crowd.” Piglet held on very tightly to the balloon. He wasn’t quite sure what a crowd was, something like a dark cloud perhaps, but in any case, he didn’t want to get lost in it and was pleased the balloon would help. So, the presents were ready and, side-by-side, Winnie-the-Pooh (Edward Bear, Bear of Very Little Brain, Brave Adventurer and Loyal

Friend), his small companion Piglet, Eeyore and Christopher Robin set off for London.

“Of course, London is on quite the other side,” remarked Christopher Robin as they were walking. “Of the sea?” asked Pooh, somewhat alarmed. “Not the sea, I shouldn’t think,” replied Christopher Robin,

whose Geography lessons so far had been mostly spent colouring in edgy bits. “But certainly the country or county. I’m not quite sure which. In any case, it is very far off, and we shall have to catch a train.” “I do hope it wants to be caught,” said Pooh, who was already a little out of puff from the walk. But the train was good enough to stop for them in the station so there was no catching to be done at all and there was plenty of time to climb aboard and find four comfy seats and then they were off!

“Would you be so kind as to stay very close by?” asked an anxious Piglet as they got off the train at Victoria Station.




Finish reading the story here: https://cdnvideo.dolimg.com/cdn_assets/c746f1893ff36c08a697a03e750688ae3bc4c498.pdf

All Winnie The Pooh content and images were taken from this source.

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